Boston University College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences:
Sargent College

Boston University College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College

Vocational Empowerment Photovoice

Marie E. Restrepo-Toro, Cheryl Gagne, Zlatka Russinova, Philippe Bloch, Sharon Pritchett, Tracy Woods, and Debbie Nicolellis

VEP cover
Curriculum / Workbook (PDF)

$44.97

Was: $89.95

Vocational Empowerment Photovoice

Marie E. Restrepo-Toro, Cheryl Gagne, Zlatka Russinova, Philippe Bloch, Sharon Pritchett, Tracy Woods, and Debbie Nicolellis

$44.97

Was: $89.95

Audience

Administrators, program managers, supervisors, practitioners, and peer support personnel may find the content of the Vocational Empowerment Photovoice curriculum useful in their work to support the vocational aspirations of people in recovery.

Additional Materials for Purchase

Description

The purpose of the Vocational Empowerment Photovoice (VEP) program is to help people think about work and empower them to set a vocational goal. For many people who have a diagnosis of a serious mental illness, it is hard to imagine working. It may seem like there are just too many barriers, and it may be hard to know where to start. This program will invite participants to consider pursuing a meaningful vocational life.

Vocational empowerment is about feeling confident in one’s own ability to get and keep a job. Photovoice is a way that an individual or a group can capture strengths, problems, or concerns by combining photographs and written text. The writing and the photographs are used with group discussions that help people reflect on themselves and their situations in a positive way that educates and increases their confidence.

The curriculum includes two books: a Leader’s Guide and a Workbook for participants. For each Class Session, there is a detailed lesson for you to follow in the Leader’s Guide, and a section in the Workbook for participants to follow along. The group is designed as an interactive, dynamic class with several components, to be led by peer leaders well-versed in VEP. Each participant needs to have a Workbook along with a pen or pencil to write during the Photovoice sessions.

There are five sections included in the Leader’s Guide for each group session:

  • An overview of the session
  • A training schedule for each module
  • Background on the session content
  • A list of materials or supplies needed for that session
  • A session plan

The Leader’s Guide also includes an Appendix with Tips for Administrators and Supervisors Implementing Vocational Empowerment Photovoice.

Designed for use with Training Consultation from the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation. It is highly recommended that the VEP curricula is paired with installation and expertise training from our trainers at the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation. If you are interested in Consultation/In-Service Training about how to best use these vocational training materials in your program or agency, please contact: psyrehab@bu.edu

Citation: Restrepo-Toro, M. E., Gagne, C.,  Russinova, Z., Bloch, P., Pritchett, S., Woods, T., & Nicolellis, D. (2015). Vocational empowerment photovoice. Boston, MA: Boston University, Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation.

Product Details

Leader’s Guide

PDF file: 218 pages
Published: 2015
ISBN: 978-1-878512-60-4

Workbook

PDF file: 80 pages
Published: 2015
ISBN: 978-1-878512-59-8

Table of Contents

Leader’s Guide

  • Introduction for Group Leaders
  • Background on the Curriculum
  • What is Vocational Empowerment?
  • What is Photovoice?
  • How to Use the Curriculum
  • What’s in the Curriculum
  • Using the Workbook
  • Using the Leader’s Guide
  • Tips for Leading the Group
  • Photovoice Exhibit
  • Exhibiting the Final Vocational Empowerment Photovoice work
  • Session 1: Introduction to Vocational Empowerment Photovoice
  • Session 2: My Working Life
  • Session 3: Writing Your Photovoice Narrative
  • Session 4: My Vocational Values
  • Session 5: My Vocational Identity
  • Session 6: The Costs and Benefits of a Working Life (Part One)
  • Session 7: The Costs and Benefits of a Working Life through Interviewing Others (Part Two)
  • Session 8: Vocational Supports and Services
  • Session 9: Setting Goals
  • Session 10: My Vocational Journey
  • Three Booster Sessions: Follow-Up
  • Individual Sessions Guide
  • Footnotes 183

Appendix: Tips for Administrators and Supervisors Implementing Vocational Empowerment Photovoice

  • Introduction
  • Background on the Vocational Empowerment Photovoice Curriculum
  • Administrator Tips: Planning to Implement the Vocational Empowerment Photovoice Program
  • Tips for Supervisors
  • References

Workbook

  • Session 1: Introduction to Vocational Empowerment Photovoice
  • Session 2: My Working Life
  • Session 3: Writing your Photovoice Narrative
  • Session 4: My Vocational Values
  • Session 5: My Vocational Identity
  • Session 6: Costs and Benefits of Working: Part One
  • Session 7: Costs and Benefits of Working through Interviewing Others (Part Two)
  • Session 8: Vocational Supports and Services
  • Session 9: Setting Goals
  • Session 10: My Vocational Journey
  • Booster Session #1 Worksheet Session
  • Booster Session #2 Worksheet
  • Booster Session #3 Worksheet
  • Celebrating Our Photovoice Work!
  • Release Form

Authors

Maria Restrepo-Toro photo

Maria Restrepo-Toro, MS

Ms. Restrepo-Toro was a Senior Training Associate and worked in several research projects and divisions throughout the years.  Maria has six years of clinical experience, and she developed the Latino Initiatives at the Center. She trained people in the field of vocational psychiatric rehabilitation both nationally and internationally, in both English and Spanish. She developed training materials, both in English and Spanish. She was the Principal Investigator for a Field Initiated project funded by NIDRR. She was a Co-Principal investigator for phase I / II of Community Action Grant for System Changes within Massachusetts. She was responsible for coordinating the implementation of an exemplary practice that will be culturally competent and will meet the rehabilitation and recovery needs of the Latino consumers within the state. Maria strongly believes in the need to empower Latinos with psychiatric disabilities to recover and regain hope, and to gain equal access to rehabilitation services.

Cheryl Gagne photo

Cheryl Gagne, ScD

Dr. Gagne had been with the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation since 1988 when she joined the Supported Employment Research Project Team.  Since then she has worked in numerous research, training, and service projects at the Center. Currently, Dr. Gagne is a senior training associate and spends her time training and consulting with mental health programs in the United States and internationally.  She is the associate director of the Services Division of the Center, which develops, delivers, and evaluates innovative services for people with psychiatric disabilities. She has developed many training programs and courses for mental health professionals and people who use mental health services. Since 1994, Dr. Gagne has taught the course, Rehabilitation of Persons with Psychiatric Disabilities, at Boston University.

Zlatka Russinova bio image

Zlatka Russinova, PhD

Dr. Russinova is the Director of Research at the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation and a Research Associate Professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy at the Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences. She has directed several research projects exploring diverse aspects of recovery from psychiatric disabilities, including examining the patterns and determinants of vocational recovery, the role of spirituality and alternative therapies, and the measurement of mental health practitioners’ recovery-promoting competence. She has also pioneered a novel approach of using Photovoice methodology as part of psychosocial interventions targeting the reduction of personal stigma, community participation and vocational empowerment.

Philippe Bloch bio image

Philippe Bloch, MEd

Mr. Bloch is Senior Research Coordinator at the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation, Boston University. As an almost 20-year member of the Research Division, he assists Principal Investigators with study management tasks that include a wide range of responsibilities. Mr. Bloch has helped develop curricula that have served as the primary intervention for a number of studies. Specific areas of interest include prejudice and discrimination related to mental illness, vocational recovery, empowerment of marginalized populations, and the photovoice participatory action methodology. Mr. Bloch considers principles of human rights, civil liberties, and social justice to be the foundational basis for his work in the field.

Sharon Prichett

Tracy Woods, BA

Ms. Woods is a Massachusetts Certified Peer Specialist and has contributed as both a student and an instructor at the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation’s Recovery Education Program since 2007. In her capacity as a peer instructor, Tracy has taught wellness classes related to substance free lifestyle, mindful eating, and recovery as a way of life. Tracy also has developed her knowledge and expertise in the area of stigma and discrimination through teaching Photovoice, an intervention that focuses on combating ignorance, prejudice, and discrimination. Using a newly developed curriculum, Vocational Empowerment Photovoice, Tracy has both taught and supported the delivery of this intervention as a research demonstration project. Tracy also contributes to the Center’s research endeavors via qualitative coding and data analysis. Tracy received her BA from Monmouth College and has attained continuing education in mathematics and electronics from the Lowell Institute School, Northeastern University’s College of Professional Studies.

Debbie Nicolellis photo

Debbie Nocolellis, MS

Ms. Nicolellis served as Program Manager at the Boston University Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation. She directed the Certificate Program in Psychiatric Vocational Rehabilitation, an award-winning training program for vocational rehabilitation professionals, and the Vocational Peer Support Training Project, a federally-funded curriculum designed to train peer support specialists in supporting vocational recovery. Debbie began her work with the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation as Supported Education and Employment Specialist in 1989. She focused on enhancing the competencies and conceptual knowledge of mental health, rehabilitation, and peer support personnel in psychiatric rehabilitation and recovery-oriented services throughout the country and abroad. Debbie specialized in the Psychiatric Vocational Rehabilitation process, Social Security Work Incentives, Readiness Assessment and Development, Employment Support, Vocational Peer Support, and enhancing partnerships with people with psychiatric disabilities. Debbie has authored several curricula, book chapters, and articles in Psychiatric Rehabilitation.

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