Employment Readings

Readings for Consumers

Allen, J. B. (1995) Don’t judge a book by its cover: Qualified employees under the ADA. The Journal of the California Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 6(4), 29-30.

  • The author discusses the experience of Andy, an illiterate young man with schizophrenia, who became employable when practitioners worked at building on strengths rather than focusing on deficits.

 

Beall, M.A. (1995) Of camels and the eyes of needles : A cautionary tale. The Journal of the California Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 6(4), 51-52.

  • Ms. Beall describes her efforts to have her psychiatric disability accommodated. According to Ms. Beall, the lack of any policies regarding accommodations impaired her ability to perform her job and eventually led to her resignation. This case illustrates the confusion that surrounds the issue of reasonable accommodation in the workplace.

 

Callner, J. (1995) You’re only as sick as your secrets. The Journal of the California Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 6(4), 33-34.

  • Callner discusses the fear of consumers that employers will not hire an applicant who discloses a mental illness. He then goes on to discuss the support he has received since disclosure.

 

Carringer, L. M. (1995) Discarded people. The Journal of the California Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 6(4), 49-50.

  • The author discusses her struggle with both a physical and psychological disability. She relates her coworkers’ insensitivity to her difficulties and her supervisor’s refusal to consider accommodating her needs in any way that would have enabled her to continue performing the job she had done for several years.

 

Fisher, D.B. (1995) Disclosure, discrimination, and the ADA. The Journal of the California Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 6(4), 55.

  • Fisher discusses the concerns people with psychiatric disabilities have about disclosing their disability, despite the protection against discrimination offered by the ADA. Dr. Fisher is a psychiatrist who also has a history of serious mental illness.

 

LaPolla, S. M. (1995) Disclosure. The Journal of the California Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 6(4), 53-54.

  • LaPolla recounts her struggle with manic depression, then her difficulty deciding whether or not to disclose to her employer. She relates her process of disclosure and its successful aftermath.

 

Maida, P.R. (1995) Mediation and reasonable accommodations. The Journal of the California Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 6 (4), 38-39.

  • Maida describes how mediation can be used to resolve disputes about reasonable accommodation. He suggests that consumers should consider the role of mediation in negotiating reasonable accommodations.

 

Moore, J. A. (1995) Can the ADA work for people with mental illness? The Journal of the California Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 6(4), 25-26.

  • Jane Moore says that in order for the law to work for people with mental illnesses, it will take the courage of many individuals to disclose and request accommodations. Moore discusses the fears individuals with psychiatric disabilities have about disclosing.

 

Monson, K. (1995) On display without accommodation. The Journal of the California Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 6 (4), 44-48.

  • Kate Monson, an individual with bipolar disorder, writes about her experience working at a department store doing the advertising displays. She discusses how she managed working and dealing with her disability and how she was fired.

 

Roberts, M., Rotteveel J. & Manos E. (1995) Mental health consumers as professionals : Disclosure in the workplace. American Rehabilitation, 21(1), 20-23.

  • This article examines the complex issues of disclosure to both supervisors and coworkers by the mental health professional that has a psychiatric disability.

 

Sands, D. (1995) Reasonable accommodation or improbable emancipation? The Journal of the California Alliance for the Mentally Ill, 6(4), 21-22.

  • Diane Sands is a healthcare marketing specialist who lives with OCD. She discusses how the ADA has improved the quality of life for millions of Americans who might otherwise be excluded from the productive workforce.

 


Note: The information contained in these pages is for educational purposes only, and is not legal advice. Individuals should contact the appropriate legal resources for specific legal advice regarding their particular situations.