Opportunities for Latinos

Building Opportunities, Bringing Hope


“Access to good mental health care and the mental health status of Latinos in the US is critical not only for the development of healthy Latino communities, but also fundamental for overall health of our nation.”—Executive Summary, Critical Disparities in Latino Mental Health, 2005

Over 14% of the US population is made up of Latinos—(US Census Bureau, 2004).

In 2005, among members of the APA who are licensed psychologists with active clinical practices, only 1% identified themselves as Latinos.—(Rios-Ellis, 2005).

 

While the recovery vision for people with psychiatric disabilities has been put forward to guide policies and practice in state mental health systems (New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, 2003), the current danger is that this vision, and the policy and practice changes it engenders, will not affect the quality of services delivered to the nation’s largest minority, Latinos. Significant barriers exist in providing adequate mental health and rehabilitation services for Latinos, among them: an insufficient number of culturally sensitive mental health providers; an insufficient body of research, conducted with Latino mental health consumers; and minimal involvement of Latinos and Latino consumers in the shift in mental health services to a recovery-oriented model.

Through the Latino Initiatives, the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation has been working over the past ten years to create tools, conduct research, and provide training in collaboration with Latino consumers, family members and professionals. The Center continues its efforts to assist the building of communities capable of supporting the journey to recovery with the creation of a new culturally adapted rehabilitation readiness guide, a new Latino consumer-provider training program, and research into the provider competencies specifically relevant for working with Latinos.


Challenges for Latino Psychiatric Rehabilitation

There is a growing urgency to promote recovery-oriented psychiatric rehabilitation services among Latino communities. Over 14% of the US population is made up of Latinos (US Census Bureau, 2007) In addition to comprising a substantial sector of the existing population in the United States, the Hispanic/Latino population is characterized by its rapid growth. There were 35.3 million people of Latino descent in the U.S. by 2000 (U.S. Census, 2001), an increase of 60% over the 1990 Census data. Yet current literature suggests enormous disparities in the availability of, access to, and provision of both health care and mental health services to the Latino population (Acosta, 2005; DHHS, 2001; Lewis-Fernandez, et al., 2005; Rios-Ellis, 2005; Ruiz 2005).

Based on the Department of Health’s Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services’ Cultural Competence Standards (SAMHSA, 2000), significant barriers exist in providing adequate mental health and rehabilitation services for Latinos. These barriers include (but are not limited to):

  1. socio-demographic characteristics of the Latino population itself such as high unemployment, low educational attainment and literacy, which in and of themselves create challenges to providing adequate mental health and rehabilitation services;
  2. an insufficient number of bilingual, culturally sensitive mental health providers trained in rehabilitation;
  3. minimal involvement of Latino consumers in the growing paradigm shift in mental health services from a pathology-focused model to a recovery-oriented model;
  4. an insufficient body of research, conducted with Latino mental health consumers, that can shed light on relevant cultural issues as they relate to mental health, rehabilitation and recovery services; and
  5. an insufficient body of research conducted with Latino consumers about the specific skills providers should possess and strategies they should engage in promoting recovery.

Latino Initiatives

The Latino Initiative at the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation at Boston University works in collaboration with organizations that want to improve mental health services for Latino consumers. It offers training programs for providers who wish to work with the Latino community. In 1998, the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation secured funding from the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) to jumpstart a Latino Initiative. The purpose was to create an adaption for Latinos of the Choose, Get, and Keep model of vocational rehabilitation. This funding was the start of a unique opportunity to work collaboratively with Latino professionals, family members, and consumers in Massachusetts through building consensus about vocational interventions for Latinos with mental illness. The funding supported the cultural adaptation and dissemination of the vocational rehabilitation model.


Rehabilitation Tools for Latinos—Assessing Readiness

A major outcome of this early Latino initiative was the awareness that many Latino consumers had not been exposed to nor had experience with psychiatric rehabilitation. Prior involvement in readiness activities is an important part of making the move to engage in rehabilitation services. Funded by the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), an innovative Spanish guide entitled, Abriendo caminos en tu vida: Guia de preparación para la rehabilitación psiquiátrica, (Opening Paths in Your Life: Guide to Prepare for Psychiatric Rehabilitation) was designed specifically to help Latinos with psychiatric disabilities assess their level of readiness to engage in rehabilitation services.

This unique guide was created in collaboration with agencies in Massachusetts and California; with the input and feedback of consumers and their families. Data for both sites demonstrated that Latinos are very interested in thinking about a change; are dissatisfied with their current situation; value the support of others; and are not aware of the various resources available to them in their communities. In addition, data showed that Latinos gave importance on having a network of support when thinking about doing a change in their lives. The guide’s content areas, writing approach, and design reflect the incorporation of all those findings. Consumers and their family members further collaborated in the creation of the guide through their choice of colors and images that enhance the understanding of the psychiatric rehabilitation readiness indicators (ie, self-awareness, need for change, commitment to change, environmental awareness).

The result was an easy-to-use, step-by-step decision-making tool in Spanish that guides participants from thinking about change to identifying concrete activities that help individuals to assess their readiness for rehabilitation in an effective and culturally appropriate way.


Latino Consumers Becoming Latino Providers

As Latino consumers become more engaged in the process of recovery and rehabilitation, there is a growing interest and advantage to providing training opportunities for individuals who may wish to become consumer providers and/or leaders. In response to this interest, the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation in collaboration with the BestNow program of the Alameda County Network of Mental Health Clients and the Consumer Organization and Networking Technical Assistance Center are working together to create a uniquely designed training program for Latino consumers. The program is jointly funded by NIDRR and CMHS. It is specifically designed for Latino consumers and is comprised of state-of-the-art training in recovery and rehabilitation knowledge and leadership skills. This effort meets the need for Latino consumers to be increasingly active as mental health services shift to a recovery orientation. It also addresses the challenge of increasing the number of trained and culturally sensitive mental health providers.


Measuring Competencies That Promote Recovery Among Latinos

Literature suggests that it is critical for mental health interventions to be compatible with family and cultural values and for communication with Spanish speaking mental health consumers to be culturally congruent (Barrio, 2000). Given the ongoing shortage of Latino mental health providers it is imperative that high priority be given to training and educating non-Latino professionals as they relate to the needs of the Latino population (Ruiz, 2005). However, in order to effectively train individuals to be able to provide culturally sensitive mental health care, it is necessary to clearly ascertain the specific strategies, attitudes and skills that have a positive impact on recovery among those who come from a Spanish-speaking culture.

In response, the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation is conducting a new research study, funded by NIDRR, to adapt the existing instrument, the “Recovery Promoting Relationship Scale.” The purpose of adapting this scale is to better understand those specific provider competencies that have a positive impact on recovery among Latinos. The study entails a full cultural adaptation of the scale, not merely a translation of this scale that was developed for a Caucasian population. It will pilot test the psychometric properties of the scale and test its clinical utility among various Spanish-speaking groups.


Moving Forward

Latino Initiatives at the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation at Boston University will continue developing partnerships with Latino consumers, their families and professionals across the country to create tools, develop training and conduct research. In this way, progress is made toward building a community where Latinos with psychiatric disabilities have greater access to psychiatric rehabilitation services that create opportunities and bring hope in their journey toward recovery.


References

Acosta, H. (2005). Racial and ethnic minority groups still face disparities in access to high-quality mental health services. The National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) Advocate, 3(4), 22–23.

Barrio, C. (2000). The cultural relevance of community support programs. Psychiatric Services, 51(7), 879–884.

Lewis-Fernandez, R., Das, A. K., Alfonso, C., Weissman, M. M., & Olfson, M. (2005). Depression in US Hispanics: Diagnostic and management considerations in family practice. Journal of The American Board of Family Practice, 18(4), 282-296.

New Freedom Commission on Mental Health. (2003). Achieving the Promise: Transforming Mental Health Care in America. Final Report. Pub. No. SMA-03-3832. Rockville, MD: Department of Health and Human Services.

Rios-Ellis, B. (2005). Critical disparities in Latino mental health: Transforming research into action. National Council of La Raza (NCLR): Institute for Hispanic health, Executive Summary.

Ruiz, P. (2005). Hispanics’ mental healthcare plight. Behavioral Health Management, 25(6), 17–19.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services. (2000). Cultural competence standards in managed care mental health services: Four underserved/underrepresented racial/ethnic groups. Retrieved January 30, 2006, from www.mentalhealth.org/publications/allpubs/SMA00-3457/.

U.S. Census Bureau (2001, May). The Hispanic Population: Census 2000 Brief. Retrieved March 13, 2008, from http://www.census.gov/prod/2001pubs/c2kbr01-3.pdf

U.S. Census Bureau (2007, February). The American Community – Hispanics: 2004. Retrieved March 13, 2008, from http://www.census.gov/prod/2007pubs/acs-03.pdf.

United States Department of Health and Human Services. (2001). Mental Health: Culture, Race and Ethnicity—A Supplement to Mental Health: A report of the Surgeon General—Executive Summary. Rockville, MD.


Acknowledgements

The Latino Initiatives want to thank their collaborators for their ongoing support: Alameda County Behavioral Health Care System; Bay Cove Human Services Inc; The Community Research Foundation; The Consumer Organization and Networking Technical Assistance Center; The National Resource Center for Hispanic Mental Health, New Jersey Mental Health Institute; North Hudson Community Action Corporation Health Center at West New York; Northeast Independent Living Center; and The Puerto Rican Family Institute.

The Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation has been jointly funded as a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) in mental health by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) and the Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

To find out more about Latino Initiative’s products, training and research, contact Maria Elvira Restrepo-Toro, Senior Training Associate at the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation at 617/353-3549 or visit the Center’s website for more information.

  • Abriendo caminos en tu vida: Guia de preparación para la rehabilitación psiquiátrica, (Opening Paths in Your Life: Guide to Prepare for Psychiatric Rehabilitation)—http://www.bu.edu/cpr/products/curricula/abriendo.html
  • Abriendo Caminos Instruction Manual, excerpt—http://www.bu.edu/cpr/products/curricula/sample-acim.pdf
  • Abriendo Caminos, Webcast—A free online video in English describing the rehabilitation readiness guide and the process surrounding its development http://www.bu.edu/cpr/webcast/latinoreadiness/

Caption

The guide helps identify the supports that are intrinsic to the Latino individual when making changes in his or her life. In addition, the pictures clarify the step-by-step decision making during the recovery and rehabilitation process.


Testimonials

The following are comments from those who participated in the development of the rehabilitation readiness guide, Abriendo caminos en tu vida: Guia de preparación para la rehabilitación psiquiátrica.

“The tool was easy and friendly. It is written in a clear fashion and the use of visual aids on the pages was helpful.”

“Thank you for letting me be part of the study. I found it to be a helpful and useful tool. All the clients who completed the guide found it to be a positive experience and even the ones who became anxious were able to be aware of their anxiety and address it in the session. It also gave for most clients the possibility to work more directly with the therapist to begin some work on their specific rehabilitation goal.”

“I liked the quotes and corresponding pictures on each page. It helped maintain the client’s interest and participation while encouraging them to interpret the image and think about their own goals.”

———– SPANISH VERSION ————-


Oportunidades para latinos

“El acceso a una buena atención de salud mental y el estatus de la salud mental de los latinos en los Estados Unidos es crucial no solo para el desarrollo de una comunidad latina saludable, sino también es fundamental para la salud en general de nuestra nación.”

—Resumen ejecutivo, Disparidades críticas en la salud mental para los latinos, 2005

En el año 2005, entre los miembros de APA con licencias de psicólogos y con prácticas clínicas activas, solo un 1% se identificaron como latinos —(Rios-Ellis, 2005).

Más de un 14% de la población de Estados Unidos está compuesta por latinos— (Oficina del Censo de los Estados Unidos, 2004).


Creando oportunidades, fomentando la esperanza

Aunque la visión de recuperación de las personas con discapacidades psiquiátricas ha sido presentada para guiar las políticas y prácticas de los sistemas de salud mental del estado (Comisión Nueva Libertad en Salud Mental, 2003), el peligro que actualmente existe es que estas políticas y prácticas no afectarán la calidad de los servicios que se ofrecen a los latinos, el cual es el mayor grupo minoritario de la nación. Existen barreras importantes para proveer una atención de salud mental adecuada y servicios de rehabilitación para latinos, entre las cuales se podrían mencionar: la existencia de un número insuficiente de proveedores de salud mental culturalmente sensibles; un escaso cuerpo de investigación que cuente con la participación de consumidores latinos de salud mental, y una participación mínima de latinos y consumidores latinos en la transferencia de servicios de salud mental a un modelo orientado hacia la recuperación.

A través de la Iniciativa Latina, el Centro de Rehabilitación Psiquiátrica ha estado trabajando durante los últimos diez años para crear herramientas, realizar investigaciones y ofrecer entrenamiento en colaboración con consumidores latinos, miembros de la familia y profesionales. El Centro continúa en su esfuerzo para ayudar a construir comunidades capaces de apoyar la travesía hacia la recuperación con la creación de una nueva Guía culturalmente adaptada que facilita la preparación para la rehabilitación, con un nuevo programa de entrenamiento para consumidores latinos quienes también desean trabajar como proveedores, y a través de investigaciones sobre las capacidades y aptitudes especialmente relevantes para trabajar con latinos.


Retos que enfrenta la Rehabilitación psiquiátrica para latinos

Existe una necesidad urgente de promover los servicios de rehabilitación psiquiátrica orientados hacia la recuperación en la comunidad latina. Más de un 14% de la población de los Estados Unidos está compuesta por latinos (Oficina del Censo de los Estados Unidos, 2007). Además de conformar un sector importante de la población actual de la nación, la población latina/hispana se caracteriza por su rápido crecimiento. Había 35.3 mi-llones de personas de origen latino en los Estados Unidos para el año 2000 (Censo de los Estados Unidos, 2001), un incremento de un 60% sobre la información registrada en el Censo de 1990. Aún la literatura reciente sugiere la existencia de enormes disparidades en la disponibilidad de y acceso a suministro de atención de salud y servicios de salud mental para la población latina (Acosta, 2005; DHHS, 2001; Lewis-Fernandez, et al., 2005; Rios-Ellis, 2005; Ruiz 2005).

Basándose en el Informe Final de Cultural Competence Standards de la Administración de Servicios de abuso de sustancias y salud mental (SAMHSA 2000, por sus siglas en inglés) existen barreras significativas para proporcionar una atención de salud mental y servicios de rehabilitación satisfactorios para los latinos. Estas barreras incluyen (pero no se limitan) a:

  1. Características socio-demográficas propias de la población latina, tales como alto desempleo, bajos logros desde el punto de vista educativo y de alfabetización, los cuales a su vez constituyen mayores retos para proveer una atención de salud mental y servicios de rehabilitación satisfactorios.
  2. Un escaso número de proveedores de salud mental bilingües, culturalmente sensibles y entrenados en rehabili-tación.
  3. La mínima participación de latinos o consumidores latinos en el creciente paradigma del cambio de servicios de salud mental basado en un modelo enfocado en la enfermedad hacia un modelo basado en la recuperación.
  4. Investigaciones insuficientes que cuenten con la participación de consumidores latinos de salud mental, que pudiesen brindar información relevante acerca de los servicios de salud mental, rehabilitación y recuperación.
  5. Existen escasas investigaciones rea-lizadas con consumidores latinos acerca de las destrezas de rehabilitación que los proveedores deberían tener y las estrategias que deberían utilizar para promover la recuperación.

Iniciativa Latina

La Iniciativa Latina del Centro de Rehabilitación Psiquiátrica de la Universidad de Boston trabaja en colaboración con organizaciones que desean mejorar los servicios de salud mental para consumidores latinos. Ofrecemos programas de entrenamiento dirigidos a profesionales que desean trabajar con la comunidad latina. En 1998, el Centro de Rehabilitación Psiquiátrica obtuvo financiamiento proveniente del Centro para Servicios de Salud Mental (CMHS, por sus siglas en inglés) para empezar a desarrollar la Iniciativa Latina. El propósito de esta iniciativa fue crear una adaptación del modelo de rehabilitación vocacional “Elegir-conseguir-retener” para los latinos. Estos fondos fueron el comienzo de una oportunidad extraordinaria para trabajar en colaboración con profesionales latinos, miembros de la familia y consumidores en Massachusetts, a través de crear consenso acerca de intervenciones vocacionales para latinos con discapacidades psiquiátricas. Los fondos financiaron la adaptación cultural y la difusión de información acerca del modelo de rehabilitación vocacional.


Herramientas para latinos—evaluando la preparación para la rehabilitación

Una de las primeras enseñanzas obtenidas a través de la Iniciativa Latina fue el conocimiento de que muchos consumidores latinos no han tenido la oportunidad de tener acceso a la rehabilitación psiquiátrica. También es importante tener la oportunidad de participar en actividades que ayuden a las personas a estar preparadas para la rehabilitación. Con fondos obtenidos a través del Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones sobre Discapacidad y Rehabilitación (NIDRR, por sus siglas en inglés) se desarrolló una guía innovadora en español que lleva por título: Abriendo caminos en tu vida: Guía de preparación para la rehabilitación psiquiátrica, la cual fue específicamente diseñada para ayudar a latinos con discapacidades psiquiátricas para evaluar si están listos para recibir servicios de rehabi-litación.

Esta guía excepcional fue creada con la colaboración de agencias ubicadas en Massachusetts y California, y con el aporte y retroalimentación de consumidores y sus familias. La información obtenida en ambos sitios demostró que los latinos están muy interesados en pensar acerca de realizar un cambio; también están descontentos con su situación actual; valoran el apoyo que reciben de los demás, y desconocen los recursos disponibles que existen en sus comunidades. Además, la información obtenida demostró que los latinos le dan importancia a contar con una red de apoyo cuando piensan realizar un cambio en sus vidas. El contenido y di-seño de la guía reflejan la incorporación de los hallazgos obtenidos. Los consumidores y miembros de sus familias colaboraron en la creación de la guía a través de la selección de colores e imágenes que realzan la comprensión de los indicadores de preparación de rehabilitación (necesidad de un cambio, nivel de compromiso para el cambio y conocimiento de uno mismo y del ambiente).

El resultado fue una herramienta senci-lla para tomar decisiones paso a paso y escrita en español. La guía estimula a las personas a pensar si están listos para realizar un cambio en sus vidas e identificar actividades concretas que les ayuden a evaluar la preparación para la rehabi-litación de una manera efectiva y culturalmente apropiada.


Consumidores latinos transformándose en Proveedores

En la medida en que los consumidores latinos se involucran más en el proceso de recuperación y rehabilitación, existe un gran interés y muchas ventajas en ofrecer oportunidades de entrenamiento a indivi-duos a quienes les gustaría convertirse en proveedores de salud mental y/o líderes.

En respuesta a este interés, el Centro de Rehabilitación Psiquiátrica de la Universidad de Boston en colaboración con el Programa BestNow del Alameda County Network of Mental Health Clients y el Centro para la Asistencia Técnica en la red y organización de Consumidores (CONTAC, por sus siglas en inglés), están trabajando juntos para crear un programa único de entrenamiento diseñado para consumidores latinos. Este programa está patrocinado conjuntamente por el Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones sobre Discapacidad y Rehabilitación (NIDRR, por sus siglas en inglés) y por el Centro de Servicios de Salud Mental. Este programa, específicamente diseñado para el consumidor latino, tiene componentes de entrenamiento que proporcionan los más novedosos conocimientos y destrezas específicas sobre recuperación, rehabilitación y lide-razgo. Este esfuerzo satisface la necesidad de que los consumidores latinos participen de una manera cada vez más activa en la medida en que los servicios de salud mental cambian hacia un modelo orientado hacia la recuperación y también trata de abordar el reto de la necesidad de aumentar el número de proveedores de salud mental entrenados en rehabilitación y culturalmente sensibles.


Evaluando destrezas que promueven la recuperación en la población latina

La literatura sugiere que para las intervenciones de salud mental es fundamental ser compatibles con los valores familiares y culturales, y que para la comunicación con consumidores de salud mental que hablan español hay que ser culturalmente congruente (Barrio, 2000). Dada la actual escasez de proveedores de salud mental latinos, es imperativo que se le dé alta prioridad para entrenar y educar a profesionales no-latinos en la medida en que se relacionan con las necesidades de la población latina (Ruiz, 2005). Para poder entrenar efectivamente a individuos para que estén en capacidad de proporcionar una atención de salud mental culturalmente sensible, es necesario identificar claramente las estrategias específicas, actitudes y destrezas que tienen un impacto positivo en la recuperación entre consumidores de habla hispana.

En respuesta, el Centro de Rehabilitación Psiquiátrica está desarrollando un nuevo proyecto de investigación financiado por el NIDRR, para adaptar el instrumento existente conocido como “Escala para evaluar cómo las relaciones interpersonales promueven la recuperación.” El propósito de adaptar esta escala es entender mejor aquellas destrezas del proveedor que impactan positivamente la recuperación entre los latinos. El estudio desarrollará una adaptación cultural completa de la escala, no una simple traducción de la que fue desarrollada para la población caucásica, y además evaluará las propiedades psicométricas de la escala y su utilidad clínica entre diferentes grupos de latinos.


Mirando hacia el futuro

La Iniciativa Latina del Centro de Rehabilitación Psiquiátrica de la Universidad de Boston continuará colaborando con consumidores latinos, sus familias y profesionales a lo largo del país, para crear herramientas, desarrollar entrenamientos y realizar investigación. De esta manera, se logran progresos al construir una comunidad donde los latinos con discapacidades psiquiátricas tienen más acceso a servicios de Rehabilitación Psiquiátrica que crean oportunidades y fomentan la esperanza para facilitarles su travesía hacia la recuperación.


Bibliografía

Acosta, H. (2005). Racial and ethnic minority groups still face disparities in access to high-quality mental health services. The National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) Advocate, 3(4), 22–23.

Barrio, C. (2000). The cultural relevance of community support programs. Psychiatric Services, 51(7), 879–884.

Lewis-Fernandez, R., Das, A. K., Alfonso, C., Weissman, M. M., & Olfson, M. (2005). Depression in US Hispanics: Diagnostic and management considerations in family practice. Journal of The American Board of Family Practice, 18(4), 282-296.

New Freedom Commission on Mental Health. (2003). Achieving the Promise: Transforming Mental Health Care in America. Final Report. Pub. No. SMA-03-3832. Rockville, MD: Department of Health and Human Services.

Rios-Ellis, B. (2005). Critical disparities in Latino mental health: Transforming research into action. National Council of La Raza (NCLR): Institute for Hispanic health, Executive Summary.

Ruiz, P. (2005). Hispanics’ mental healthcare plight. Behavioral Health Management, 25(6), 17–19.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services. (2000). Cultural competence standards in managed care mental health services: Four underserved/underrepresented racial/ethnic groups. Retrieved January 30, 2006, from www.mentalhealth.org/publications/allpubs/SMA00-3457/.

U.S. Census Bureau (2001, May). The Hispanic Population: Census 2000 Brief. Retrieved March 13, 2008, from http://www.census.gov/prod/2001pubs/c2kbr01-3.pdf

U.S. Census Bureau (2007, February). The American Community – Hispanics: 2004. Retrieved March 13, 2008, from http://www.census.gov/prod/2007pubs/acs-03.pdf.

United States Department of Health and Human Services. (2001). Mental Health: Culture, Race and Ethnicity—A Supplement to Mental Health: A report of the Surgeon General—Executive Summary. Rockville, MD.


Agradecimientos

La Iniciativa Latina le gustaría agradecer a diferentes organizaciones por su continuo apoyo y colaboración: Community Research Foundation; Bay Cove Human Services Inc; Northeast Independent Living Center; National Resource Center for Hispanic Mental Health, New Jersey Mental Health Institute Inc.; The Puerto Rican Family Institute; Alameda County Behavioral Health Care System; el Centro para la Asistencia Técnica en la red y orga-nización de Consumidores (CONTAC, por sus siglas en inglés); North Hudson Community Action Cooperation Health Center at West New York.

El Centro de Rehabilitación Psiquiátrica ha sido financiado conjuntamente como Centro de Entrenamiento e investigación en Rehabilitación en salud mental (RRTC, por sus siglas en inglés) por el Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones sobre Discapacidad y Rehabilitación (NIDRR, por sus siglas en inglés) y la Administración de Servicios de abuso de sustancias y salud mental (SAMHSA, por sus siglas en inglés).

 

Para más información acerca de productos relacionados con la Iniciativa Latina, entrenamiento e investigación, contacte a María Elvira Restrepo-Toro, Facilitadora Asociada Senior, en el Centro de Rehabilitación Psiquiátrica por el teléfono 617/353-3549 o visite el sitio Web del Centro.

  • Abriendo caminos en tu vida: Guía de preparación para la rehabilitación psiquiátrica—http://www.bu.edu/cpr/products/curricula/abriendo.html
  • Abriendo Caminos manual de instrucción, extract—http://www.bu.edu/cpr/products/curricula/sample-acim.pdf
  • Abriendo Caminos—Video gratis en inglés disponible en Internet que describe la guía de preparación para la rehabilitación y el proceso que rodea su desarrollo—http://www.bu.edu/cpr/webcast/latinoreadiness/

Caption

La guía ayuda a identificar los apoyos que son intrínsecos a las personas latinas cuando realizan cambios en sus vidas. Además, las fotos clarifican la toma de decisiones durante el proceso de recuperación y rehabilitación.

A continuación encontrará comentarios de algunas personas que participaron en el desarrollo de la Guía de preparación para la rehabilitación Abriendo caminos en tu vida: Guía de preparación para la rehabilitación psiquiátrica.


Testimonials

“La herramienta fue fácil de usar. Está escrita de una manera clara y el uso de ayudas visuales en las páginas fue muy útil.”

“Gracias por permitirme ser parte de este estudio. Me dí cuenta de que es una herramienta útil y de gran ayuda. Todos los clientes que completaron la guía dijeron tener una experiencia positiva, inclusive aquellos que se sintieron nerviosos pudieron reconocer su ansiedad y la enfrentaron durante la sesión. También ofreció a la mayoría de los clientes la oportunidad de trabajar más directamente con los terapistas para comenzar a realizar algún trabajo en relación a sus metas específicas de rehabilitación.”

“Me gustaron las citas y sus dibujos correspondientes en cada página. Me ayudó a captar la atención e interés del cliente en participar mientras le alentaba a interpretar la imagen y les hacía pensar acerca de sus propias metas.”