Research Program Projects (2009-2014)


 

Research Priority 1: Employment Interventions and Accommodations

A randomized clinical trial evaluating the incremental efficacy of Vocational Illness Management and Recovery (V-IMR) when compared to Individual Placement and Support (IPS) alone

Zlatka Russinova, Ph.D.
Project Director
zlatka@bu.edu

Vasudha Gidugu, M.A.
Senior Research Coordinator
vasudha@bu.edu

Overview

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the Vocational Illness Management and Recovery (V-IMR) program in enhancing the employment outcomes of individuals with psychiatric disabilities, who are recipients of Individual Placement and Support (IPS) services.

The V-IMR intervention and curriculum to be tested have been developed under the Training program, TDTA project Vocational Illness Management and Recovery: Developing a Training Program for Providers. The V-IMR is an innovative modification of the original IMR program, which has been established as the evidence-based practice (EBP) targeting both capacity to manage one’s own mental illness and functional outcomes. Contact for information on the Training project: Dori Hutchinson, Marianne Farkas.

The incremental efficacy of the vocationally oriented IMR intervention will be established through a randomized controlled trial (RCT) being carried out at three different clinical programs located in the states of Texas, Colorado, and Connecticut with a total of 300 subjects.

 

A randomized clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of a peer-run PhotoVoice-based intervention to empower Caucasians, African Americans and Latinos with psychiatric disabilities to pursue employment

Zlatka Russinova, Ph.D.
Project Director
zlatka@bu.edu

Philippe Bloch, M.Ed.
Research Coordinator
bloch@bu.edu

Overview

The purpose of this study is to evaluate an innovative peer-run psycho-educational group intervention titled “Vocational Empowerment Photovoice (VEP)” that aims to empower individuals with psychiatric disabilities to pursue vocational goals.

The intervention and curriculum for both the general and Spanish population have been developed under the Training program, TDTA project entitled Vocational Empowerment: The Development of a Culturally Competent Peer-Run Photovoice Training Program. Contact for information on the Training project: Maria Restrepo-Toro

The efficacy of this intervention is being evaluated through a preliminary study using a small randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a total of 60 individuals, who are not working or engaged in vocational services due to beliefs that their psychiatric disability prevents them from working. We have also conducted a small test of a Spanish version of VEP that has undergone a systemic cultural adaptation for this study.

 

A randomized clinical trial examining the effectiveness of peer-delivered vocational supports

E. Sally Rogers, Sc.D.
Project Director
erogers@bu.edu

Mihoko Maru, M.A.
Senior Research Coordinator
mmaru@bu.edu 

Overview

Peer and mutual support programs have burgeoned in the last decade and empirical data suggests that participation results in improved clinical outcomes, larger social support networks and improved well-being. To date, however, we know of no study examining the use of peer support services for individuals in the process of choosing, getting, and keeping employment.

The purpose of this study is to conduct a randomized clinical trial with 200 study participants to examine the effectiveness of a vocational peer support intervention developed under the Training program, in the TDTA project entitled Vocational Peer Support: The Development of a Curriculum to Train Peer Specialists to Support the Vocational Aspirations of People with Psychiatric Disabilities. Study elements address recipient’s perceptions of vocational peer support relative to promoting choice about work, their entry into, and retention of employment. Training materials for training vocational peer specialists in conjunction with TDTA staff will address issues of workforce preparation for peer-delivered services and replication of the model. The study is being conducted with peer programs in Massachusetts and Arizona. Contact for information on the Training project: Marianne Farkas

 

Enhancing employment through a combined supported employment/supported education model: An exploratory study

Dori S. Hutchinson, Sc.D.
Project Director
dorih@bu.edu

E. Sally Rogers, Sc.D.
Director of Research
erogers@bu.edu

Mihoko Maru, M.A.
Senior Research Coordinator
mmaru@bu.edu 

Overview

The purpose of this project is to conduct an exploratory study examining processes and preliminary outcomes and to generate new knowledge about a promising program model hypothesized to potentiate employment: a combined supported education and employment intervention. This study was implemented in the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation’s Recovery Services, an innovative new program which addresses consumers’ parallel needs for both supported employment (SE) and supported education (SEd).

 

Research Priority 2: Barriers and Facilitators related to Effective Employment Partnerships

 

Analysis of the effectiveness of the Northeast Partnership of Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIGs) in improving interagency collaboration to promote employment among persons with disabilities

E. Sally Rogers, Sc.D.
Project Director
erogers@bu.edu

Vasudha Gidugu, M.A.
Senior Research Coordinator
vasudha@bu.edu

Overview

The purpose of this project is to study the barriers to, and facilitators of, effective collaboration and partnerships among a myriad of state and federal agencies whose mission is to provide employment services to individuals with disabilities. This includes state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies, the Social Security Administration, state and local mental health programs, Department of Labor One-Stops, and consumer-directed programs. We will use the methodological framework of an organizational case study with key informant interviews and other data collection strategies to examine the activities of Medicaid Infrastructure Grants, (MIGs) that were authorized under the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act with the goal of improving employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

 

Research Priority 3: Employment Interventions for Traditionally Underserved Groups

 

A randomized clinical trial evaluating the incremental efficacy of Vocational Illness Management and Recovery (V-IMR) when compared to Individual Placement and Support (IPS) alone

Zlatka Russinova, Ph.D.
Project Director
zlatka@bu.edu

Vasudha Gidugu, M.A.
Senior Research Coordinator
vasudha@bu.edu

Overview

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the Vocational Illness Management and Recovery (V-IMR) program in enhancing the employment outcomes of individuals with psychiatric disabilities, who are recipients of Individual Placement and Support (IPS) services.

The V- IMR intervention and curriculum to be tested have been developed under the Training program, TDTA project Vocational Illness Management and Recovery: Developing a Training Program for Providers. The V-IMR is an innovative modification of the original IMR program, which has been established as the evidence-based practice (EBP) targeting both capacity to manage one’s own mental illness and functional outcomes. Contact for information on the Training project: Dori HutchinsonMarianne Farkas.

The incremental efficacy of the vocationally oriented IMR intervention will be established through a randomized controlled trial (RCT) being carried out at three different clinical programs located in the states of Texas, Colorado, and Connecticut with a total of 300 subjects.