Vocational Illness Management and Recovery

 

Dori Hutchinson, Marianne Farkas, and Cheryl Gagne

VIMR Cover

Price: $129.95   $64.97

Price includes one copy of the:

Product includes:

  • Provider’s Guide
  • Participant’s Workbook
  • Implementation Guide

+ Extra Participant Workbook (PDF files): $25.00  $12.50

 

Audience: Administrators, program managers, supervisors, practitioners, and peer support personnel may find the content of the Vocational Illness Management and Recovery curriculum useful in their work to support the vocational aspirations of people in recovery.

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Description

The Vocational Illness Management and Recovery curriculum has three parts:
Provider’s Guide, Participant Workbook, and Implementation Guide.

The Provider’s Guide is designed to provide you with the information, strategies, and tools for using Vocational Illness Management and Recovery (VIMR), a modification of the evidenced-based Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) curriculum that is oriented towards helping people with mental health conditions live well and thrive as they choose, get, and keep meaningful employment. It is a practical step-by-step guide for providers.

The Provider’s Guide contains the values, principles, and key concepts that are the foundation of using VIMR, as well as a lesson plan for each of the nine modules of curriculum using jargon-free language, educational worksheets, and additional resources. This guide is meant to support providers to assist people who want to work to achieve wellness and employment.

The VIMR process teaches skills and strategies that have been shown to be helpful in alleviating distress caused by symptoms and work-related stress. The strategies in the Participant Workbook also can help you solve work relationship issues, handle stress better at work, improve your work-life balance, become more confident, and experience greater wellness. Further, these strategies can help you if you are struggling to maintain sobriety or to live and work without substances. The VIMR provides a structure that can help you make these changes so you achieve your work and recovery goals.

The Implementation Guide is designed as a supplement to the Vocational Illness Management and Recovery (VIMR): Wellness for Work Participant Workbook and to the VIMR Provider’s Guide. Administrators, program managers, and supervisors may find the content of this Implementation Guide useful in their work to support the vocational aspirations of people in recovery.

 

Citation: Hutchinson, D., Farkas, M. D., & Gagne, C. (2015). Vocational illness management and recovery. Boston, MA: Boston University, Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation.

 

Designed for Use with Training Consultation from the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation

It is highly recommended that the VIMR curricula is paired with installation and expertise training from our trainers at the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation. If you are interested in Consultation/In-Service Training about how to best use these vocational training materials in your program or agency, please contact: psyrehab@bu.edu


Product Details

Provider’s Guide

PDF: 49 Pages
Published: 2015
ISBN-13: 978-1-878512-65-9

 

Participant’s Workbook

PDF: 261 Pages
Published: 2015
ISBN-13: 978-1-878512-68-0

 

Implementation Guide

PDF: 66 Pages
Published: 2015
ISBN-13: 978-1-878512-67-3

 

Table of Contents

Provider’s Guide

  • Overview of Vocational Illness Management and Recovery
  • Vocational Recovery and Wellness
  • The Importance of Helping People Set Meaningful Goals
  • The Core Values of Vocational Illness Management and Recovery
  • Participants
  • Logistics
  • Using the Modules
  • Overview of Strategies
  • Cognitive-Behavioral Techniques
  • Involvement of Significant Others
  • The Content
  • Format of the VIMR Sessions
  • Goal Setting
  • Developing Effective Practice Assignments
  • Module 1: Recovery and Vocational Recovery
  • Module 2: Practical Facts about Mental Health Conditions and Work
  • Module 3: The Stress Vulnerability Model and Vocational Recovery
  • Module 4: Using Medication Effectively and Avoiding Drugs and Alcohol for Vocational Success
  • Module 5: Coping with Challenges and Symptoms at Work
  • Module 6: Coping with Stress at Work
  • Module 7: Building Social Relationships at Work
  • Module 8: Preventing Relapses
  • Module 9: Performing Your Best at Work
  • Example: Goal Tracking Sheet
  • Worksheet: Goal Tracking Sheet
  • References

 

Participant’s Workbook

  • Overview of Vocational Illness Management and Recovery
  • Vocational Recovery and Wellness
  • The Importance of Helping People Set Meaningful Goals
  • Core Values of Vocational Illness Management and Recovery
  • How Will This Workbook Help You?
  • How to Use this Workbook
  • References
  • Module 1: Recovery and Vocational Recovery
  • Module 2: Practical Facts about Mental Health Conditions and Work
  • Module 3: The Stress Vulnerability Model and Vocational Recovery
  • Module 4: Using Medication Effectively and Avoiding Drugs and Alcohol for Vocational Success
  • Module 5: Coping with Challenges and Symptoms at Work
  • Module 6: Coping with Stress at Work
  • Module 7: Building Social Relationships at Work
  • Module 8: Preventing Relapses
  • Module 9: Performing Your Best at Work

 

Implementation Guide

  • Introduction to the Implementation Guide
  • Vocational Illness Management & Recovery: Wellness for Work: Concepts
  • The VIMR Intervention and Provider Training
  • For Administrators
    • Introduction
    • Organizational Self-Assessment
    • Training Assessment Key
    • Developing Training Readiness
    • Incorporating VIMR into Organizations
    • Some Common Questions about Implementation
  • For Supervisors
    • Introduction to VIMR Supervision
    • Vocational Illness Management and Recovery Intervention Integrity Scale
    • Tips for Supervisors
    • Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4
  • References

Authors


Dori HutchinsonDori Hutchinson, ScD, has worked at the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation at Boston University for 25 years.  She currently serves as the Director of Services Division which serves women, men, and youth with serious psychiatric illnesses who also may be homeless, at risk for homelessness, and experience significant co-morbidiites.  Her programs have included: Hope and Health: an evidenced-based program of health education for persons with serious mental illness and serious medical issues; the Recovery Center–a Holistic health Adult Education program; The Training for the Future Computer Program; a vocational training program; Jump Start-a Career Oriented Peer Mentoring Program for Young Adults with mental illness: The College Mental Health Initiative and Individualized Recovery and Health Promotion Services for persons with serious mental illness.  She was a project director of a NIMH funded pilot study evaluating the quality of inpatient care for women with psychiatric disabilities who were trauma survivors. She serves as an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at Boston University.  Dr. Hutchinson sits on several community mental health center advisory boards both locally in Massachusetts and nationally. Dr. Hutchinson was the 2000 recipient of the International Association of Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services Association’s (IAPSRS) Early Career Research Award for her contributions on health issues for persons with serious psychiatric disabilities.  She served as the chairwoman of the research committee of the International Association of Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services Association (IAPSRS), now known as USPRA, from 2002-2004 and is currently an active member. Dr. Hutchinson has developed and implemented recovery-oriented service initiatives that assist people who have mental illness assume their rightful roles as students, employees, residents and members of their communities.  She provides training nationally to organizations and providers who wish to deliver recovery-oriented services and conduct relevant program evaluations.  Over the last 20 years she also has developed health service initiatives in community rehabilitation settings, inpatient settings, and educational settings that provide health promotion knowledge and skills to empower people with psychiatric disabilities to recover their functional health that has resulted from the consequences of living with a serious psychiatric illness.


mafMarianne Farkas, ScD, has been and  is currently the Co-Principal Investigator of the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center for over 15 years and a professor in Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at Boston University. She has authored and co-authored over 65 articles in professional journals, 4 textbooks, a dozen book chapters, and 6 multi-media training package; and is on a  myriad of editorial review boards. For more than 30 years, Dr. Farkas has worked in various capacities in the field of psychiatric rehabilitation and recovery that have enabled her to promote the use of effective strategies and programs with diverse populations around the globe. Until recently she was the Vice President of the World Association of Psychosocial Rehabilitation (WAPR) and the President of the National Association of Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers (NARRTC). Among her many roles providing training, research, and consultation; Dr. Farkas was in charge of the World Health Organization Collaborating Center in Psychiatric Rehabilitation, providing training, consultation, and research expertise to the W.H.O. network around the globe. She has received numerous awards for her contributions to the field including a Lifetime Achievement Award in in recognition of “…her outstanding contributions to the pre-eminence and practice of psychosocial rehabilitation.”


Cheryl GagneCheryl Gagne, ScD, has been with the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation since 1988 when she joined the Supported Employment Research Project Team.  Since then she has worked in numerous research, training, and service projects at the Center.  Currently, Dr. Gagne is a senior training associate and spends her time training and consulting with mental health programs in the United States and internationally.  She is the associate director of the Services Division of the Center, which develops, delivers, and evaluates innovative services for people with psychiatric disabilities. She has developed many training programs and courses for mental health professionals and people who use mental health services. Since 1994, Dr. Gagne has taught the course, Rehabilitation of Persons with Psychiatric Disabilities, at Boston University.

Reviews

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